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to stress the need for elected officials to act. for not only has the passage of time exacerbated some of the economic problems, it has revealed a perhaps equally-dangerous political one. our inability to grapple with pressing fiscal challenges represents nothing less than a crisis in our democratic order. compounding the instability and unpredictability in a volatile world. our propositions for this coalition are simple. the national security of the united states depends on its economic health. that health must be insured by averting the immediate crises and by laying the groundwork for a rigorous, long-term program of debt reduction, smart investment, economic growth and lower income inequality. in national security spending, we can target investments much more efficiently in response to threats that are evolving before our eyes. and resources need to be shifted toward nonmilitary elements of our national security posture. in the immediate term -- and by that i mean over the next four weeks -- we must avoid driving our country over the fiscal cliff. no partisan ideology is worth the
that president was in cambodia right after the election. he was in burma. secretary clinton moved widely throughout the region as does secretary panetta. and the amount of activities that i do and my forces do have been a prompt jump in what we've done in the past, and we're looking for opportunities to do more exercise. we're doing more of those things already. i think it's visible to our allies. i think it's visible to our partners. not to be invisible to the region. we also want to jump, where's the next summary our aircraft carrier, that's always the sake of. and we will, over time as you heard secretary panetta said, we will rebalance our navy towards the pacific, and i party mentioned in my opening remarks, we are rapidly moving our most capable assets in the region because of some of the ballistic missile defense will be facing of those types of things. so i think it's not about one thing. it's about a holistic approach, and what if you on the military side is only one aspect of a. it's got to be tied to what's happening in the economic side in what's happening in the diplomatic s
these negotiations. if he really was going to have an about face after the election and really concerned about the legacy, i actually disagree to a certain extent because i think that he thinks the first four years was his legacy. >> yeah. i think you're right to some extent. this is obviously we're speculating here. the president could, this might happen, might be a last minute razzle dazzle here, where he rushes in and they've already kind of agreed to a deal and he didn't get everything he wants, but he gets most of what he wants. he might envision something like that. i'm telling you, when i heard folks like lindsey graham over the weekend say, i don't think there is going to be a deal, that kind of stuck with me and maybe there won't be a deal. i'm not sure that's such a bad thing given what the alternatives are. >> steve: i'm sure you've heard or seen that apparently the republicans doomsday plan, if the talks collapse, allowed the vote on extending the middle tax class tax cuts, the senate passed that back in august, and the republicans would all vote present, then allow the democrats t
over 11 million customers in the united states. over the past four years and into the recent election, the issue of health care has been at the center of our nation's great policy debate and implications beyond the health care industry impacting our larger fiscal policy and important social concerns. we are fortunate to have a test today mr. broussard insights on the industry in developing policy. prior to joining humana 2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transform
the re-election of the speaker? or do you think he should be fired? >> well, we're going to see how the next few weeks go and whether he is willing to make amends and put out that score card. let the american people see what he based the decision on. i think that's critical. we need to see what the decision was based on. the american people need to hear the truth. both sides need to work together. we've had enough of these games, partisan games in d.c. and enough of people sucking up to corporate lobbyists. we need to do what's right for the american people. >> that sounds like a no. >> i'm trying to figure out if it is a no. it is a yes/no question. if the vote were taken right now, would you support him or n not? >> right now i'm not very happy with the speaker. so let's see what happens over the next several weeks. let's put it that way. >> congressman justin amash, thank you for your time. we appreciate it. >> thank you, soledad. >> you bet. >>> gun culture in the nfl. bob costas took a lot of heat when he made comments about gun control. did he it in the middle of the a game. t
relationship, i don't think that that kind of thing -- >> what matters is japan does have election on the summer 16th. are they worried about china trying to put together a leader democracy in the region including india because that was his strategy that if you put together things, much more like your when you think, i know you can't in your position talk one way or another about prime minister but this notion about a strategic -- is japan really need to invest in structures that balance -- are you worried that given your experience you have to balance china much more vigorously than you did in the past? >> yes. most frequently you ask question for japanese people is whether we regard china as a threat or a chance for an hour and should is would like to see china development as a chance rather than threat. >> what you think will really happen? >> there is a assumption that china continues to be kind of international stakeholder, stakeholder, international community. international order and they respect the communication with the other countries. on the assumption i think we can wel
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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